After Yorktown, the Continental Congress appointed a small group of statesmen who traveled to Europe and negotiated a peace treaty with the British: John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, Thomas Jefferson, and Henry Laurens. Hoffman, Ronald, and Peter J. Albert, eds. Peace and the Peacemakers: The Treaty of 1783. Charlottesville: Published for the United States Capitol Historical Society of the University Press of Virginia, 1986. This treaty and the separate peace agreements between Britain and the nations that supported the American cause – France, Spain and the Republic of the Netherlands – are known together as the Peace of Paris. [3] [4] Only Article I of the Treaty, which recognizes the existence of the United States as a free, sovereign and independent state, remains in force. [5] Jedson, Lee. The Treaty of Paris, 1783: A primary examination of the source of the treaty that recognized American independence. New York: Rosen Pub. Group, 2006.

[Catalog Dataset] The Treaty of Paris ended the War of Independence between Britain and the United States, recognized American independence, and set limits on the new nation. After the British defeat at Yorktown, peace talks began in April 1782 in Paris between Richard Oswarld, representing Britain, and American peace commissioners Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and John Adams. Henry Laurens joined american negotiators two days before the signing of the provisional articles of peace on November 30, 1782. The Treaty of Paris, which officially ended the war, was not signed until September 3, 1783. The Continental Congress, which was temporarily sitting in Annapolis, Maryland, at that time, ratified the Treaty of Paris on January 14, 1784. The Treaty of Paris of 1783 officially ended the American War of Independence. American statesmen Benjamin Franklin, John Adams and John Jay negotiated the peace treaty with representatives of King George III of Great Britain. In the Treaty of Paris, the British Crown officially recognized American independence and ceded most of its territory east of the Mississippi to the United States, doubling the size of the new nation and paving the way for westward expansion. Although the treaty secured the independence of the United States, it left several border regions undefined or controversial, and some provisions were also not enforced. These issues have been resolved over the years, but not always undisputed, by a number of American agreements with Spain and Britain, including the Jays Treaty, the Treaty of San Lorenzo, the Convention of 1818, and the Webster Ashburton Treaty of 1842.

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